Under The Microscope

Airfoil 4.5.7 Brings Lion Compatibility

Airfoil for Mac IconAirfoil 4.5.7 is an important update to our audio streaming tool, particularly for all Mac OS X 10.7 (Lion) users, thanks to Instant On version 4.1. Instant On is an optional add-on for Airfoil which enables capture of all System Audio, as well as grabbing audio from already-running applications (instead of requiring that the application be quit and relaunched)

Unfortunately, this handy functionality was broken with the update to Lion. It took a lot of late nights (and one unfortunate false start) to get Instant On working again, but it’s finally here. We wish we could have had it sooner, but we’re delighted to have it available now.

We want to thank our users for their patience as we got this functionality working. We also want to take the time to apologize to those users and developers who had the misfortune of running into the issues caused by Instant On 4.0, as part of the quickly-retracted Airfoil 4.5.6. We did our very best to get the issues cleared up as soon as we could, but we obviously wish we’d never released the conflict into the wild at all.

Now then, all Airfoil 4 users should head over to the Airfoil page to get this free update now. If you’re an Audio Hijack Pro or Nicecast user, stay tuned – we’ll have updates for those apps very soon.

6 Responses to “Airfoil 4.5.7 Brings Lion Compatibility”

  1. Ron Gomes says:

    Is it not the case that after installation of Airfoil 4.5.7 and Instant On 4.1 on Lion, the Instant On capability becomes available for Audio Hijack Pro and Nicecast as well?

    That seems to be what’s happened on my system. Unless I’m fooling myself.

  2. Tim Lawson says:

    Following Ron’s comment… mine seems to work in the same way but when I look at the installed extras in ‘Audio Hijack Pro’, it tells me that the installed ‘Instant On’ version is 4.1.0 as well as asking me to “Please update to version 3.0.2″. Presumably, the dialog is not set to update this latter text when the ‘Instant On’ component is installed by another app.?

  3. Paul Kafasis says:

    The latest version of Instant On will always be picked up by all apps. So, if you install Instant On 4.1 with Airfoil, Audio Hijack Pro and Nicecast will pick it up as well – that’s how it’s designed to work.

    Tim Lawson: That’s a minor bug, one we’ve corrected already for future versions.

  4. David says:

    @Paul:

    1) Please add KeypassX to the list of problem apps (in case anyone else experiences the same issue, Google might then help them)

    2) Please reconsider the comment you left previously about not emailing users because the update was only up for 48 hours. An email, especially one worded like your blog post, would alarm very few users in my opinion. A few people would check their version and roll back if they cared. No big deal.

    On the other hand, I recently upgrade my ram to 8GB, and thinking the fault lied there, wasted a lot of my time learning about and running memtest, as well as HD diskutils, calling AppleCare, trying to decipher crash reports, etc.

    I think the cost/benefit of sending out an email would make you look proactive and helpful; whereas instead I now feel annoyed at your company that wasted my time when a simple email would have set me on the right path.

    I love AirFoil! But communication is never the wrong move. And this isn’t like the dropbox snafu where – even though they were under an even greater ethical obligation to notify users – that email would have understandably led to lost customers and concerns about their security. Not the case here; you had nothing to lose.

  5. Dan Kordik says:

    Thanks for all of the hard work you guys put into this, and congrats on fixing this for Lion!

  6. Paul Kafasis says:

    David: We’re certainly sorry you ran into issues. However, we stand by the methods we used to alert users – in addition to the drastic step of retracting the update, we issued our warnings via the same methods the update was announced, as well as to any affected developers.

    Any cost/benefit analysis needs to consider our raw number of users (tens of thousands) vs. the number of people affected (a few hundred). Causing needless worry and wasting the time of tens of thousands of people who hadn’t installed the update at all was not worth it. “Communication” is too broad a term, but unnecessary warnings certainly CAN be the wrong move – there was immense downside, of scaring folks who had nothing to be worried about at all.

    As I said, we’re certainly sorry you had to spend time figuring this out, but in aggregate, we stand by the steps we took.


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